sorted by: new top controversial old
8
submitted 2 hours ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]

China's expanded Law on the Guarding of State Secrets, which was passed by lawmakers in February, took effect on May 1 to bring it into line with Chinese President Xi Jinping's recent efforts to broaden national security-driven regulations.

The law, which was initially adopted in the 1980s, now has an expanded definition of "sensitive information" and a tightened control over social media posts.

Where's the red line?

Taiwan's Mainland Affairs Council (MAC), which handles cross-Strait affairs, said that the expanded legislation was "highly vague and may cause people to break the law at any time."

The expanded law means the risk to people from Taiwan visiting China is likely to "increase significantly," according to an MAC statement.

"You never know where the red line is," said Tao Yi-chun, an assistant professor of sociology at Taiwan's National Tsing Hua University in Hsinchu.

"What is considered a secret?" Tao asked. "This is a very broad and vague restriction, and in most cases, many things can be interpreted in different ways."

Tao Yi-chun, who specializes in contemporary Chinese studies, has made several visits to China to conduct field surveys. But the amendment prompted Taiwanese authorities to urge the people from the island to "carefully assess whether travel to mainland China is necessary."

They warned that, at the discretion of Beijing, any data collected could be deemed "harmful" — even if it is intended for journalism, academic research, business investment inquiries or "just a casual conversation with locals."

Beijing considers self-ruled Taiwan to be Chinese territory, and Xi has made "reuniting" the democratic island with mainland China a long-running centerpiece of his strategic policy.

'Work secrets'

The state secrets law, which was first revised in 2010, now further extends the scope of restrictions to "work secrets."

The term "work secrets" refers to information not categorized as state secrets but prone to "cause a definite adverse impact after leaking," according to the legislation.

In addition, the law requires "network operators" to assist in investigations into social media posts involved in suspected leaks, including removing, saving records and reporting them to authorities.

"Public sentiment is, of course, crucial data that must be firmly controlled by the [Chinese] government," Professor Tao told DW.

While Chinese internet companies already face strict regulations, the latest changes are believed to have reached a new level of self-monitoring and cooperation with authorities.

'No one can guarantee who's absolutely safe'

Chinese officials said in February that the improvement of the law is "to better address the new situations and tasks" as domestic and international conditions have profoundly changed.

However, Taiwan's MAC noted that when this type of "vague provision" lacks clear guidelines, it is "not uncommon" for Taiwanese and other foreign nationals to be "falsely accused" while participating in exchange activities in mainland China.

Lee Ming-che, a prominent Taiwanese human rights activist, told DW that Beijing is simply "legalizing" what it had been doing and turned the law into a weapon to "divide its own people and create external enemies."

In 2017, Lee was found guilty of criticizing the Chinese government and put behind bars for five years in China under the crime of "subverting state power." His case, at the time, sparked a widespread chilling effect among activists on the island.

"No one can guarantee who is absolutely safe," Lee told DW, as the latest revisions again aim to cover a wide range of issues which provide room for interpretation.

Academic exchanges now involve more caution

China's State Security Ministry last week announced that a professor from an unnamed country "illegally collected" data from a local national about wetland reserves and forest areas "in the name of academic cooperation."

With Beijing's constant attempts to bolster its legal tools for national security, Professor Tao admitted to feeling "concerned." Now he usually visits China by official invitations and avoids bringing his private cellphone and laptop.

Tao also no longer insists that his students' dissertations must include field surveys in China but emphasized that he still "encourages" — or at least "doesn't oppose" — students traveling there to take a look around.

By enacting vague regulations, China's Xi hopes to create an environment where "everyone suspects, reports and competes against each other," Tao said.

Are young people in Taiwan worried?

In 2023, cultural and academic exchanges between university students from both sides resumed after China lifted its COVID pandemic-related restrictions.

The low-cost, packaged tours have attracted young people who want to learn more about China. With groups of around 30-40 people, they will have an opportunity to visit different provinces for sightseeing or industrial tours.

Chen Yu-wei, a former student union president of Taiwan's National Cheng Kung University, went to Macau and Beijing with a tour group from 2018 to 2019.

Not too concerned by the newly-revised law, Chen believes Chinese authorities are less likely to target students during such a trip because the purpose is to deliver a positive image of cross-Strait exchanges.

A Taiwanese university student, who went on another group tour to China only a year ago, told DW that he would not dare to visit the country alone. The student, who asked not to be named, claimed that a "propaganda video" discussing state secrets was already played on the plane bound for China.

"In hindsight, it's evident that the [Communist] party had been laying the groundwork for a long time," he said.

But for young people like him and Chen, China is considered a place with no rule of law. Whatever new provisions are put in place, "if China wants to catch you, they can find a way," Chen said.

7
submitted 2 hours ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]

China's expanded Law on the Guarding of State Secrets, which was passed by lawmakers in February, took effect on May 1 to bring it into line with Chinese President Xi Jinping's recent efforts to broaden national security-driven regulations.

The law, which was initially adopted in the 1980s, now has an expanded definition of "sensitive information" and a tightened control over social media posts.

Where's the red line?

Taiwan's Mainland Affairs Council (MAC), which handles cross-Strait affairs, said that the expanded legislation was "highly vague and may cause people to break the law at any time."

The expanded law means the risk to people from Taiwan visiting China is likely to "increase significantly," according to an MAC statement.

"You never know where the red line is," said Tao Yi-chun, an assistant professor of sociology at Taiwan's National Tsing Hua University in Hsinchu.

"What is considered a secret?" Tao asked. "This is a very broad and vague restriction, and in most cases, many things can be interpreted in different ways."

Tao Yi-chun, who specializes in contemporary Chinese studies, has made several visits to China to conduct field surveys. But the amendment prompted Taiwanese authorities to urge the people from the island to "carefully assess whether travel to mainland China is necessary."

They warned that, at the discretion of Beijing, any data collected could be deemed "harmful" — even if it is intended for journalism, academic research, business investment inquiries or "just a casual conversation with locals."

Beijing considers self-ruled Taiwan to be Chinese territory, and Xi has made "reuniting" the democratic island with mainland China a long-running centerpiece of his strategic policy.

'Work secrets'

The state secrets law, which was first revised in 2010, now further extends the scope of restrictions to "work secrets."

The term "work secrets" refers to information not categorized as state secrets but prone to "cause a definite adverse impact after leaking," according to the legislation.

In addition, the law requires "network operators" to assist in investigations into social media posts involved in suspected leaks, including removing, saving records and reporting them to authorities.

"Public sentiment is, of course, crucial data that must be firmly controlled by the [Chinese] government," Professor Tao told DW.

While Chinese internet companies already face strict regulations, the latest changes are believed to have reached a new level of self-monitoring and cooperation with authorities.

'No one can guarantee who's absolutely safe'

Chinese officials said in February that the improvement of the law is "to better address the new situations and tasks" as domestic and international conditions have profoundly changed.

However, Taiwan's MAC noted that when this type of "vague provision" lacks clear guidelines, it is "not uncommon" for Taiwanese and other foreign nationals to be "falsely accused" while participating in exchange activities in mainland China.

Lee Ming-che, a prominent Taiwanese human rights activist, told DW that Beijing is simply "legalizing" what it had been doing and turned the law into a weapon to "divide its own people and create external enemies."

In 2017, Lee was found guilty of criticizing the Chinese government and put behind bars for five years in China under the crime of "subverting state power." His case, at the time, sparked a widespread chilling effect among activists on the island.

"No one can guarantee who is absolutely safe," Lee told DW, as the latest revisions again aim to cover a wide range of issues which provide room for interpretation.

Academic exchanges now involve more caution

China's State Security Ministry last week announced that a professor from an unnamed country "illegally collected" data from a local national about wetland reserves and forest areas "in the name of academic cooperation."

With Beijing's constant attempts to bolster its legal tools for national security, Professor Tao admitted to feeling "concerned." Now he usually visits China by official invitations and avoids bringing his private cellphone and laptop.

Tao also no longer insists that his students' dissertations must include field surveys in China but emphasized that he still "encourages" — or at least "doesn't oppose" — students traveling there to take a look around.

By enacting vague regulations, China's Xi hopes to create an environment where "everyone suspects, reports and competes against each other," Tao said.

Are young people in Taiwan worried?

In 2023, cultural and academic exchanges between university students from both sides resumed after China lifted its COVID pandemic-related restrictions.

The low-cost, packaged tours have attracted young people who want to learn more about China. With groups of around 30-40 people, they will have an opportunity to visit different provinces for sightseeing or industrial tours.

Chen Yu-wei, a former student union president of Taiwan's National Cheng Kung University, went to Macau and Beijing with a tour group from 2018 to 2019.

Not too concerned by the newly-revised law, Chen believes Chinese authorities are less likely to target students during such a trip because the purpose is to deliver a positive image of cross-Strait exchanges.

A Taiwanese university student, who went on another group tour to China only a year ago, told DW that he would not dare to visit the country alone. The student, who asked not to be named, claimed that a "propaganda video" discussing state secrets was already played on the plane bound for China.

"In hindsight, it's evident that the [Communist] party had been laying the groundwork for a long time," he said.

But for young people like him and Chen, China is considered a place with no rule of law. Whatever new provisions are put in place, "if China wants to catch you, they can find a way," Chen said.

8
submitted 3 hours ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]

- Adverts containing AI-manipulated images were submitted to Facebook by civil and corporate accountability groups - Adverts contained known slurs towards Muslims in India, such as “let’s burn this vermin” and “Hindu blood is spilling, these invaders must be burned” - One advert called for the execution of an opposition leader they falsely claimed wanted to “erase Hindus from India”--

The Facebook and Instagram owner Meta approved a series of AI-manipulated political adverts during India’s election that spread disinformation and incited religious violence, according to a report shared exclusively with the Guardian.

Facebook approved adverts containing known slurs towards Muslims in India, such as “let’s burn this vermin” and “Hindu blood is spilling, these invaders must be burned”, as well as Hindu supremacist language and disinformation about political leaders.

Another approved advert called for the execution of an opposition leader they falsely claimed wanted to “erase Hindus from India”, next to a picture of a Pakistan flag.

The adverts were created and submitted to Meta’s ad library – the database of all adverts on Facebook and Instagram – by India Civil Watch International (ICWI) and Ekō, a corporate accountability organisation, to test Meta’s mechanisms for detecting and blocking political content that could prove inflammatory or harmful during India’s six-week election.

According to the report, all of the adverts “were created based upon real hate speech and disinformation prevalent in India, underscoring the capacity of social media platforms to amplify existing harmful narratives”.

The adverts were submitted midway through voting, which began in April and would continue in phases until 1 June. The election will decide if the prime minister, Narendra Modi, and his Hindu nationalist Bharatiya Janata party (BJP) government will return to power for a third term.

During his decade in power, Modi’s government has pushed a Hindu-first agenda which human rights groups, activists and opponents say has led to the increased persecution and oppression of India’s Muslim minority.

In this election, the BJP has been accused of using anti-Muslim rhetoric and stoking fears of attacks on Hindus, who make up 80% of the population, to garner votes.

During a rally in Rajasthan, Modi referred to Muslims as “infiltrators” who “have more children”, though he later denied this was directed at Muslims and said he had “many Muslim friends”.

The social media site X was recently ordered to remove a BJP campaign video accused of demonising Muslims.

The report researchers submitted 22 adverts in English, Hindi, Bengali, Gujarati, and Kannada to Meta, of which 14 were approved. A further three were approved after small tweaks were made that did not alter the overall provocative messaging. After they were approved, they were immediately removed by the researchers before publication.

Meta’s systems failed to detect that all of the approved adverts featured AI-manipulated images, despite a public pledge by the company that it was “dedicated” to preventing AI-generated or manipulated content being spread on its platforms during the Indian election.

Five of the adverts were rejected for breaking Meta’s community standards policy on hate speech and violence, including one that featured misinformation about Modi. But the 14 that were approved, which largely targeted Muslims, also “broke Meta’s own policies on hate speech, bullying and harassment, misinformation, and violence and incitement”, according to the report.

Maen Hammad, a campaigner at Ekō, accused Meta of profiting from the proliferation of hate speech. “Supremacists, racists and autocrats know they can use hyper-targeted ads to spread vile hate speech, share images of mosques burning and push violent conspiracy theories – and Meta will gladly take their money, no questions asked,” he said.

Meta also failed to recognise the 14 approved adverts were political or election-related, even though many took aim at political parties and candidates opposing the BJP. Under Meta’s policies, political adverts have to go through a specific authorisation process before approval but only three of the submissions were rejected on this basis.

This meant these adverts could freely violate India’s election rules, which stipulate all political advertising and political promotion is banned in the 48 hours before polling begins and during voting. These adverts were all uploaded to coincide with two phases of election voting.

In response, a Meta spokesperson said people who wanted to run ads about elections or politics “must go through the authorisation process required on our platforms and are responsible for complying with all applicable laws”.

The company added: “When we find content, including ads, that violates our community standards or community guidelines, we remove it, regardless of its creation mechanism. AI-generated content is also eligible to be reviewed and rated by our network of independent factcheckers – once a content is labeled as ‘altered’ we reduce the content’s distribution. We also require advertisers globally to disclose when they use AI or digital methods to create or alter a political or social issue ad in certain cases.”

A previous report by ICWI and Ekō found that “shadow advertisers” aligned to political parties, particularly the BJP, have been paying vast sums to disseminate unauthorised political adverts on platforms during India’s election. Many of these real adverts were found to endorse Islamophobic tropes and Hindu supremacist narratives. Meta denied most of these adverts violated their policies.

Meta has previously been accused of failing to stop the spread of Islamophobic hate speech, calls to violence and anti-Muslim conspiracy theories on its platforms in India. In some cases posts have led to real-life cases of riots and lynchings.

Nick Clegg, Meta’s president of global affairs, recently described India’s election as “a huge, huge test for us” and said the company had done “months and months and months of preparation in India”.

Meta said it had expanded its network of local and third-party factcheckers across all platforms, and was working across 20 Indian languages.

Hammad said the report’s findings had exposed the inadequacies of these mechanisms. “This election has shown once more that Meta doesn’t have a plan to address the landslide of hate speech and disinformation on its platform during these critical elections,” he said.

“It can’t even detect a handful of violent AI-generated images. How can we trust them with dozens of other elections worldwide?”

25
submitted 3 hours ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]

- Adverts containing AI-manipulated images were submitted to Facebook by civil and corporate accountability groups - Adverts contained known slurs towards Muslims in India, such as “let’s burn this vermin” and “Hindu blood is spilling, these invaders must be burned” - One advert called for the execution of an opposition leader they falsely claimed wanted to “erase Hindus from India”--

The Facebook and Instagram owner Meta approved a series of AI-manipulated political adverts during India’s election that spread disinformation and incited religious violence, according to a report shared exclusively with the Guardian.

Facebook approved adverts containing known slurs towards Muslims in India, such as “let’s burn this vermin” and “Hindu blood is spilling, these invaders must be burned”, as well as Hindu supremacist language and disinformation about political leaders.

Another approved advert called for the execution of an opposition leader they falsely claimed wanted to “erase Hindus from India”, next to a picture of a Pakistan flag.

The adverts were created and submitted to Meta’s ad library – the database of all adverts on Facebook and Instagram – by India Civil Watch International (ICWI) and Ekō, a corporate accountability organisation, to test Meta’s mechanisms for detecting and blocking political content that could prove inflammatory or harmful during India’s six-week election.

According to the report, all of the adverts “were created based upon real hate speech and disinformation prevalent in India, underscoring the capacity of social media platforms to amplify existing harmful narratives”.

The adverts were submitted midway through voting, which began in April and would continue in phases until 1 June. The election will decide if the prime minister, Narendra Modi, and his Hindu nationalist Bharatiya Janata party (BJP) government will return to power for a third term.

During his decade in power, Modi’s government has pushed a Hindu-first agenda which human rights groups, activists and opponents say has led to the increased persecution and oppression of India’s Muslim minority.

In this election, the BJP has been accused of using anti-Muslim rhetoric and stoking fears of attacks on Hindus, who make up 80% of the population, to garner votes.

During a rally in Rajasthan, Modi referred to Muslims as “infiltrators” who “have more children”, though he later denied this was directed at Muslims and said he had “many Muslim friends”.

The social media site X was recently ordered to remove a BJP campaign video accused of demonising Muslims.

The report researchers submitted 22 adverts in English, Hindi, Bengali, Gujarati, and Kannada to Meta, of which 14 were approved. A further three were approved after small tweaks were made that did not alter the overall provocative messaging. After they were approved, they were immediately removed by the researchers before publication.

Meta’s systems failed to detect that all of the approved adverts featured AI-manipulated images, despite a public pledge by the company that it was “dedicated” to preventing AI-generated or manipulated content being spread on its platforms during the Indian election.

Five of the adverts were rejected for breaking Meta’s community standards policy on hate speech and violence, including one that featured misinformation about Modi. But the 14 that were approved, which largely targeted Muslims, also “broke Meta’s own policies on hate speech, bullying and harassment, misinformation, and violence and incitement”, according to the report.

Maen Hammad, a campaigner at Ekō, accused Meta of profiting from the proliferation of hate speech. “Supremacists, racists and autocrats know they can use hyper-targeted ads to spread vile hate speech, share images of mosques burning and push violent conspiracy theories – and Meta will gladly take their money, no questions asked,” he said.

Meta also failed to recognise the 14 approved adverts were political or election-related, even though many took aim at political parties and candidates opposing the BJP. Under Meta’s policies, political adverts have to go through a specific authorisation process before approval but only three of the submissions were rejected on this basis.

This meant these adverts could freely violate India’s election rules, which stipulate all political advertising and political promotion is banned in the 48 hours before polling begins and during voting. These adverts were all uploaded to coincide with two phases of election voting.

In response, a Meta spokesperson said people who wanted to run ads about elections or politics “must go through the authorisation process required on our platforms and are responsible for complying with all applicable laws”.

The company added: “When we find content, including ads, that violates our community standards or community guidelines, we remove it, regardless of its creation mechanism. AI-generated content is also eligible to be reviewed and rated by our network of independent factcheckers – once a content is labeled as ‘altered’ we reduce the content’s distribution. We also require advertisers globally to disclose when they use AI or digital methods to create or alter a political or social issue ad in certain cases.”

A previous report by ICWI and Ekō found that “shadow advertisers” aligned to political parties, particularly the BJP, have been paying vast sums to disseminate unauthorised political adverts on platforms during India’s election. Many of these real adverts were found to endorse Islamophobic tropes and Hindu supremacist narratives. Meta denied most of these adverts violated their policies.

Meta has previously been accused of failing to stop the spread of Islamophobic hate speech, calls to violence and anti-Muslim conspiracy theories on its platforms in India. In some cases posts have led to real-life cases of riots and lynchings.

Nick Clegg, Meta’s president of global affairs, recently described India’s election as “a huge, huge test for us” and said the company had done “months and months and months of preparation in India”.

Meta said it had expanded its network of local and third-party factcheckers across all platforms, and was working across 20 Indian languages.

Hammad said the report’s findings had exposed the inadequacies of these mechanisms. “This election has shown once more that Meta doesn’t have a plan to address the landslide of hate speech and disinformation on its platform during these critical elections,” he said.

“It can’t even detect a handful of violent AI-generated images. How can we trust them with dozens of other elections worldwide?”

[-] [email protected] 1 points 3 hours ago

Na dann lassen wir das mit dem Posten hier sein, wenn Dir das so auf die Nerven geht. Aber geh' trotzdem wählen.

27
submitted 3 hours ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]

Archived link

Estonian Prime Minister Kaja Kallas has said the Baltic states should convey to Western countries the opinion that peace on Russian terms will not mean an end to human suffering.

Kallas denies that Russia is winning the war.

"I think we need to set Ukraine's victory as our goal because 'it's hard to understand how to win a war, but you will never win it if the purpose of the war is not victory'. This was said by historian Timothy Snyder, and I fully agree with him," she noted in an interview with Lithuanian public broadcaster LRT.

The Prime Minister of Estonia admitted that Western allies increasingly need to be convinced of the need to support Ukraine, but she believes that the Baltic states and Poland must explain to them what life really looked like during the Soviet occupation.

"Even the end of the war does not mean the end of human suffering. If we look at our history, after the end of World War II in our countries, there were no military actions, but there were mass deportations and our culture, our language were repressed.

All this happened in peacetime. So we know and understand that peace on Russian terms does not mean the end of human suffering, and we must convey this to our counterparts," Kallas emphasised.

Earlier, Kaja Kallas said she believes that fear stands in the way of more support for Ukraine from the rest of the free world.

Kallas has also stated she believes that Russian leader Vladimir Putin wants to use the threat of mass migration to divide and weaken Europe’s support for Ukraine.

Over the course of the next four years, Estonia will continue committing 0.25% of its GDP to military aid for Ukraine.

38
submitted 3 hours ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]

Archived link

Estonian Prime Minister Kaja Kallas has said the Baltic states should convey to Western countries the opinion that peace on Russian terms will not mean an end to human suffering.

Kallas denies that Russia is winning the war.

"I think we need to set Ukraine's victory as our goal because 'it's hard to understand how to win a war, but you will never win it if the purpose of the war is not victory'. This was said by historian Timothy Snyder, and I fully agree with him," she noted in an interview with Lithuanian public broadcaster LRT.

The Prime Minister of Estonia admitted that Western allies increasingly need to be convinced of the need to support Ukraine, but she believes that the Baltic states and Poland must explain to them what life really looked like during the Soviet occupation.

"Even the end of the war does not mean the end of human suffering. If we look at our history, after the end of World War II in our countries, there were no military actions, but there were mass deportations and our culture, our language were repressed.

All this happened in peacetime. So we know and understand that peace on Russian terms does not mean the end of human suffering, and we must convey this to our counterparts," Kallas emphasised.

Earlier, Kaja Kallas said she believes that fear stands in the way of more support for Ukraine from the rest of the free world.

Kallas has also stated she believes that Russian leader Vladimir Putin wants to use the threat of mass migration to divide and weaken Europe’s support for Ukraine.

Over the course of the next four years, Estonia will continue committing 0.25% of its GDP to military aid for Ukraine.

25
submitted 3 hours ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]

Archived link

Estonian Prime Minister Kaja Kallas has said the Baltic states should convey to Western countries the opinion that peace on Russian terms will not mean an end to human suffering.

Kallas denies that Russia is winning the war.

"I think we need to set Ukraine's victory as our goal because 'it's hard to understand how to win a war, but you will never win it if the purpose of the war is not victory'. This was said by historian Timothy Snyder, and I fully agree with him," she noted in an interview with Lithuanian public broadcaster LRT.

The Prime Minister of Estonia admitted that Western allies increasingly need to be convinced of the need to support Ukraine, but she believes that the Baltic states and Poland must explain to them what life really looked like during the Soviet occupation.

"Even the end of the war does not mean the end of human suffering. If we look at our history, after the end of World War II in our countries, there were no military actions, but there were mass deportations and our culture, our language were repressed.

All this happened in peacetime. So we know and understand that peace on Russian terms does not mean the end of human suffering, and we must convey this to our counterparts," Kallas emphasised.

Earlier, Kaja Kallas said she believes that fear stands in the way of more support for Ukraine from the rest of the free world.

Kallas has also stated she believes that Russian leader Vladimir Putin wants to use the threat of mass migration to divide and weaken Europe’s support for Ukraine.

Over the course of the next four years, Estonia will continue committing 0.25% of its GDP to military aid for Ukraine.

34
submitted 3 hours ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]

Archived link

Estonian Prime Minister Kaja Kallas has said the Baltic states should convey to Western countries the opinion that peace on Russian terms will not mean an end to human suffering.

Kallas denies that Russia is winning the war.

"I think we need to set Ukraine's victory as our goal because 'it's hard to understand how to win a war, but you will never win it if the purpose of the war is not victory'. This was said by historian Timothy Snyder, and I fully agree with him," she noted in an interview with Lithuanian public broadcaster LRT.

The Prime Minister of Estonia admitted that Western allies increasingly need to be convinced of the need to support Ukraine, but she believes that the Baltic states and Poland must explain to them what life really looked like during the Soviet occupation.

"Even the end of the war does not mean the end of human suffering. If we look at our history, after the end of World War II in our countries, there were no military actions, but there were mass deportations and our culture, our language were repressed.

All this happened in peacetime. So we know and understand that peace on Russian terms does not mean the end of human suffering, and we must convey this to our counterparts," Kallas emphasised.

Earlier, Kaja Kallas said she believes that fear stands in the way of more support for Ukraine from the rest of the free world.

Kallas has also stated she believes that Russian leader Vladimir Putin wants to use the threat of mass migration to divide and weaken Europe’s support for Ukraine.

Over the course of the next four years, Estonia will continue committing 0.25% of its GDP to military aid for Ukraine.

11
submitted 4 hours ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]

Archived link

Warsaw says its position as a hub for supplies to Ukraine has made it a key target for Russian intelligence services, and accuses Moscow of trying to destabilise the country.

“We currently have nine suspects arrested and charged with engaging in acts of sabotage in Poland directly on behalf of the Russian services,” Tusk told private broadcaster TVN24.

“This includes beatings, arson and attempted arson.”

He said Poland was collaborating with its allies on the issue and that the plots also affected Lithuania, Latvia and possibly also Sweden.

Tusk said earlier this month Poland would allocate an additional 100 million zlotys (€23.5 million) to its intelligence services due to the threat from Russia.

In April, two people were detained in Poland on suspicion of attacking Leonid Volkov, an exiled top aide to late Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny.

18
submitted 4 hours ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]

Archived link

Warsaw says its position as a hub for supplies to Ukraine has made it a key target for Russian intelligence services, and accuses Moscow of trying to destabilise the country.

“We currently have nine suspects arrested and charged with engaging in acts of sabotage in Poland directly on behalf of the Russian services,” Tusk told private broadcaster TVN24.

“This includes beatings, arson and attempted arson.”

He said Poland was collaborating with its allies on the issue and that the plots also affected Lithuania, Latvia and possibly also Sweden.

Tusk said earlier this month Poland would allocate an additional 100 million zlotys (€23.5 million) to its intelligence services due to the threat from Russia.

In April, two people were detained in Poland on suspicion of attacking Leonid Volkov, an exiled top aide to late Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny.

30
submitted 4 hours ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]

Archived link

Warsaw says its position as a hub for supplies to Ukraine has made it a key target for Russian intelligence services, and accuses Moscow of trying to destabilise the country.

“We currently have nine suspects arrested and charged with engaging in acts of sabotage in Poland directly on behalf of the Russian services,” Tusk told private broadcaster TVN24.

“This includes beatings, arson and attempted arson.”

He said Poland was collaborating with its allies on the issue and that the plots also affected Lithuania, Latvia and possibly also Sweden.

Tusk said earlier this month Poland would allocate an additional 100 million zlotys (€23.5 million) to its intelligence services due to the threat from Russia.

In April, two people were detained in Poland on suspicion of attacking Leonid Volkov, an exiled top aide to late Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny.

43
submitted 4 hours ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]

Archived link

Warsaw says its position as a hub for supplies to Ukraine has made it a key target for Russian intelligence services, and accuses Moscow of trying to destabilise the country.

“We currently have nine suspects arrested and charged with engaging in acts of sabotage in Poland directly on behalf of the Russian services,” Tusk told private broadcaster TVN24.

“This includes beatings, arson and attempted arson.”

He said Poland was collaborating with its allies on the issue and that the plots also affected Lithuania, Latvia and possibly also Sweden.

Tusk said earlier this month Poland would allocate an additional 100 million zlotys (€23.5 million) to its intelligence services due to the threat from Russia.

In April, two people were detained in Poland on suspicion of attacking Leonid Volkov, an exiled top aide to late Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny.

[-] [email protected] 1 points 16 hours ago* (last edited 16 hours ago)

Ja, die Rechten lassen nichts unversucht, und wie man in letzter Zeit sieht, agieren sie offenbar u.a. auch mit dem Geld und der Unterstützung ausländischer Diktaturen. Insofern haben sich die Zeiten geändert seit den 1930ern, nur die Mechanismen selbst sind im Grunde gleich geblieben.

[-] [email protected] 2 points 18 hours ago

Eben. Also im Juni wählen gehen. In Europa kann man das, das ist nicht überall auf der Welt so.

[-] [email protected] 3 points 19 hours ago

Nah, da darf man sich nicht einschüchtern lassen von Christian Ich-bin-dagegen Lindner. Das wird schon, nur nicht aufgeben.

[-] [email protected] 11 points 19 hours ago

As long as Russia hasn't left Ukraine, there is no such thing as security for Europe.

[-] [email protected] 1 points 19 hours ago

Deshalb muss man da nachbessern, damit Menschenrechte in Deutschland, China und allen anderen Ländern auf der Welt nicht auf der Strecke bleiben.

[-] [email protected] 7 points 20 hours ago

Deshalb ist ein europäisches Lieferkettengesetz auch so sinnvoll, denn das gilt dann über die gesamte Lieferkette, ganz gleich, ob das Endprodkt von Unternehmen verkauft wird, die in China, Europa oder sonst wo sitzt.

[-] [email protected] 5 points 22 hours ago

I have long been blocked there :-)

[-] [email protected] 3 points 1 day ago

A few statements are very illuminating. UniCredit 'set aside EUR 800m in provisions', which means they didn't pay taxes for this sum (assuming the Russian accounting law has the same principles as everywhere else which seems reasonable here), so they might have predicted the Russian move anyway.

Another point is that they report a profit for Q1-2024 that is more than double than that in Q1-2023. I would be curious to see more numbers to learn how they 'significantly reduced' their bussines.

[-] [email protected] 11 points 2 days ago

This is why Russia has to leave Ukraine.

[-] [email protected] 4 points 3 days ago

Die Vorteile des Beamtenstatus im Vergleich zu Privatangestellten betreffen weit mehr als das Kindergeld, etwa höhere Pensionen, keine Sozialversicherungsbeiträge, Zuschüsse und erleichterten Zugang zur Leistungen in der Gesundheitsvorsorge.

[-] [email protected] 37 points 3 days ago* (last edited 2 days ago)

Gibt es außer eines verfassungswidrigen Bundeshaushalts irgendetwas, dass Christian Lindner nicht ablehnt? Egal was ich lese, Lindner ist dagegen, zumindest kommt mir das vor.

Hinzufügung: Ach ja, es gibt noch was. Die Beförderungen in FDP-geführten Ministerien lehnt Lindner auch nicht ab, das hätte ich fast vergessen. Sorry.

view more: next ›

0x815

joined 1 year ago